I – Prepare

Checklist: Categories and Their Items for Every Day Carry (EDC)

Browse EDC items at AmazonPreparedness is a vital element of SemperVerus mindfulness. One act of being prepared is to be intentional about selecting specific practical items to keep with you in your pockets, purse, belt pack, day pack, or vest as you travel through your day.

[ Read the SemperVerus article, SemperVerus and the Noble Foundation of Scouting ]

Everyday carry (EDC) is the collection of useful gear you consistently tote on your person to help you overcome simple everyday problems and to anticipate unexpected and possibly dangerous situations. Your selection of tools you consider to be essential is a personal decision. An item you think is vital may not even enter the mind of someone else. But that makes it no less important for you. You need to balance practicality and preparedness with weight, bulk, and comfort. Each component of your EDC should serve a purpose or have at least one specific, useful function.

[ Read the SemperVerus article, Prepper Survival, Travel, Leadership, Reader Apps ]

Every day, your EDC essentials prepare you for the worst and empower you to do your best.

[ Read the SemperVerus article, Questions to Ask Yourself ]

To help you think through your own EDC, here’s a list of major categories to consider and item ideas for each one. You decide what and how much you want to carry every day.

Practical Knot Tying

Adventurer Bear Grylls provides instructions on learning how to tie the most practical knots you can use for everyday needs:

  • reef (square) knot (tying two rope ends together)
  • reef knot with two hitches (to prevent slippage)
  • overhand knot (tying two rope ends together that won’t unravel)
  • clove hitch (securing the rope to a post)
  • clove hitch with additional hitch or two overhand knots (to prevent slippage)
  • clove hitch using loops (securing the rope to an open pole or stake)
  • clove hitch sliding the loops together (securing the rope to a carabiner)
  • Italian hitch closing the loops on itself (to belay a person down a cliff)
  • stopper version of a hitch (to trap the rope )
  • bowline knot (for tying a rope around your waist)
  • figure-of-eight knot (for tying an adjustable loop or handhold)

[ Read the Bible Gateway Blog post, Devotional Insights on Courage by Bear Grylls ]

Checklist: Matters to Consider When Deciding on a Handgun

If you’re thinking about becoming a handgun owner, you may be wondering how to begin. Perhaps the thought of walking into a gun store makes you nervous. Or confused. The extreme variety of firearms from which to choose can be daunting and baffling.

[ Read the SemperVerus article, The 4 Basic Rules of Gun Safety ]

Click the image below to enlarge this PDF document created by SemperVerus to help you narrow the options to your specific situation. Download, print, and take it to your gun store to work through the choices with a knowledgeable and helpful firearms retailer.

[ Read the SemperVerus article, Self-Defense Training Directory ]

Checklist: Matters to Consider When Deciding on a Handgun

To help you compare how you handle different firearms, see this list of worthwhile items to evaluate compiled by TacticalProfessor Claude Werner for testing and deciding what gun is right for you. Also see his Pistol Evaluation checklist.

You may find A Glossary of Gun Terms by AmmoMan.com, Gun Glossary For Women Shooters by Carrie Lightfoot at The Well Armed Woman, and USCCA’s Terminology Guide to be useful in your personal firearm education. Also see TheTruthAboutGuns.com for “Guns for Beginners” articles.

And learn about USA state gun laws at


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A Navy SEAL Reveals 8 Secrets To Grit And Resilience

USA Navy Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) Training

What can the USA Navy SEALs and research teach us about getting through life’s tough times? James Waters, a former SEAL Platoon Commander, offers the following:

1) Purpose And Meaning
Without a good reason to keep pushing, we’ll quit. Studies of “central governor theory” show our brains always give in long before our body does.

2) Make It A Game
What’s one of the things people who live through disaster scenarios have in common? They make survival a game. The best way to deal with stress is to see problems as challenges, not threats.

3) Be Confident — But Realistic
Lack of confidence isn’t an option but neither is denial. Hope and despair can be self-fulfilling prophecies.

4) Prepare, Prepare, Prepare
Marathons aren’t as hard after a few months of training. But if you had to run one tomorrow you’d probably cry. Who survives catastrophic scenarios? The people who have prepared. Reducing uncertainty reduces fear.